Alameda, California

Alameda is located on a small island next to Oakland in the San Francisco Bay. Within Alameda is Bay Farm Island, which is connected to the Oakland International Airport. Victorian houses, tree-lined streets, and a small population make Alameda a charming place to live. According to the 2000 census, Alameda had a population of 72,259. 

The first inhabitants of the island were the Ohlone people until the Spanish claimed the area in the late 18th century. The Spanish named the city Encinal, which is Spanish for oak grove, as the surrounding area, which is now Oakland, was one of the largest coastal oak forests anywhere. The city was renamed in 1853 Alameda, which is Spanish for grove of poplar trees or tree-lined avenue. After Mexico obtained its independence from Spain, the area became part of Mexico. Then the U.S. gained control of the area after the Mexican-American War, and on June 6, 1853, the city was founded. 

In 1864, the San Francisco and Alameda Railroad opened at the Encinal station, and in 1869 the Transcontinental Railroad opened at the Alameda Terminal, which was, a short time later, moved to the Oakland Pier. A major attraction called Neptune Beach was built in 1917 and was a very popular destination in the 1920s and 1930s. In 1939, the park closed due to a few major factors: The Great Depression brought fewer visitors; the newly built Bay Bridge caused fewer people to take the train, which ran next the park, and more people to drive their cars to new places of attraction; and people began sneaking into the park to evade paying the entrance fee. Alameda was still served by Southern Pacific's steam commuter train service before the Bay Bridge was built. After the Bay Bridge was built, Southern Pacific's service, which later became East Bay Electric Liens, had electrified, full-size railroad cars that ran directly to San Francisco on the lower deck of the bridge. 

In the 1930s, Pan American established a seaplane port in Alameda that became a home to Varney Air lines, West Coast Air Transport, Western Air Express, and Coastal Air Freight. The airport closed in 1941 because its air traffic interfered with the Naval Air Station that was built nearby at the southwestern side of Alameda during at the start of World War II. During the 1950s, marshland at the southern end of Alameda was filled in and called South Shore.

Alameda has many attractions that make it a wonderful place to both visit and live. Because Alameda is close to the Bay, windsurfers and kite surfers choose the shoreline as their main destination on a breezy day. Alameda boasts one of the largest Fourth of July parades in the country, full of homemade floats, classic cars, dragons, marching bands and happy people. Also, the Oakland Raiders have their official offices and training facility in Alameda. The Raider Image, the merchandise section of the facility, is open to the public. Rosenblum Cellars Winery and St. George Spirits, the first winemaker to produce absinthe since its ban in 1912, are located in Alameda. The landmark Alameda Theatre was recently restored and celebrated its re-opening with a gala party. Webster Street hosts many arts, crafts and holiday festivals, during which the city will block of a section of the street for entertainment. Whether you live or visit Alameda, the charm the city is always available to enjoy.

At the Brod Law Firm, we care tremendously about our clients in and around Alameda, a true jewel of the Bay Area. Our focus is and has always been, to provide the best legal representation possible, and our clients are individual people, families, and small businesses.

We are Alameda injury attorneys, and we work on personal injury cases on a contingency-fee basis. Unless there is a recovery on your behalf, there are no legal fees owed. The Brod Law Firm represents small businesses in Alameda. We do not represent not large corporations or insurance companies. The Brod Law Firm works to effectively and efficiently resolve disputes, while addressing the legal and financial interests of our business clients.

Directions to our Oakland office from Alameda: Take Interstate 880 north toward Oakland and stay to the right onto Interstate 980 east (toward CA-24 to Walnut Creek). Take the 17th Street exit toward San Pablo Avenue. Turn right on 17th Street, then left onto Franklin Street. The office is at 1814 Franklin St., on the right side of the street.

Directions to our San Francisco office from Alameda: Take the Bay Bridge to San Francisco and exit at Fremont Street. Merge onto Fremont Street and turn left onto Mission Street. Turn right onto Anthony Street and take the first right onto Jessie Street. The office is at 96 Jessie St.

Client Reviews
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"I am somewhat intimidated by lawyers, however when I met Greg I was immediately at ease. He was compassionate, knowledgeable and extremely easy to talk to. He handled my case professionally and most successfully..."
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"It is difficult for anyone who has not had bedbugs to imagine the extent to which this problem negatively effects every aspect of your life. I contacted Greg Brod, and he was there for us. He listened to our problems..." Ron, Avvo review
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"We were extremely happy with the outcome of our specific case, and would absolutely recommend Greg to anyone looking for legal assistance." Celine V., Yelp review
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"I was referred to Greg Brod for a car accident I was in and I will now owe the person who referred me, forever." Christine M., Yelp review
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"Greg handled our case with a laser-focused determination to right the wrongs we had been forced to endure…Throughout the entire process, we were in constant communication, with Greg always..." America S., Yelp review
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